Heroic Bloodshed with Ringo Lam and Chow Yun Fat

The term heroic bloodshed was coined by critic Rick Baker in the late 1980s as referring to a type of Hong Kong cinema revolving around stylized action sequences and themes of brotherhood, duty, honour, redemption and violence, where gun play took the place of martial arts.

[Lam] stood out by combining his own considerable gifts for staging action with a human touch and careful observation: His tales of weary policemen and jumpy criminals have a depth, and a romanticism, that come from characterization and attention to quotidian detail.

City On Fire-1

City on Fire

Ringo Lam | Hong Kong | 1987 | 101 minutes

An impressive thriller that lays to rest the rumour that all Hong Kong has to offer is John Woo. Ringo Lam has a different, less cool, more frenetic style of gun-waving and betrayal, with more politicking on the part of the cops and crooks. If you’re used to Yun Fat’s calm in Woo movies, it’s a revelation to see him here, hyperactive and neurotic.

Prison On Fire-1

Prison on Fire

Ringo Lam | Hong Kong | 1987 | 98 minutes

An amazing genre film which reaches new heights of intensity. Ringo Lam’s gritty prison movie is meaty moviemaking at its best, and Chow Yun-Fat turns in a peerless charismatic performance.

Full Contact-1

Full Contact

Ringo Lam | Hong Kong | 1992 | 96 minutes

Super-slick, making opportune use of Bangkok locations, and relishing every violent episode, the film’s unquestionably good of its type.


City on Fire

Ringo Lam | Hong Kong | 1987 | 101 minutes
Friday 28 October 2016, 8pm

Prison on Fire

Ringo Lam | Hong Kong | 1987 | 98 minutes
Friday 4 November 2016, 8pm

Full Contact

Ringo Lam | Hong Kong | 1992 | 96 minutes
Friday 11 November 2016, 8pm